Tag Archives: luxury lifestyle

The Ultra Luxury Purveyors: Lessons from brands catering to the wealthiest one percent

by James D. Roumeliotis

Luxury Couple - Private Jet

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Several years ago, I had the privilege of working on-board the 147m/482 ft Saudi Royal family yacht the “Prince Abdul Aziz.” It was a first-hand experience with the wealthy 1% and was quite an eye-opener.  A typical day with its owners consisted of shopping at Gucci, LV, Hermes and Bulgari when we made port regardless of location in the Western Mediterranean region. The 25K euro daily average shopping splurge prompted the support staff to purchase large suitcases or trunks to be used as temporary storage. Not surprisingly, given the situation among visiting VIPs and royalty, this was the norm.

Given my professional métier in luxury brand management, I realized that this target audience belonged to a category distinct from any other which are labelled as the One Percenters.

The frequent conspicuous consumption was considered a normal occurrence for the Royalty and its VIP guests as were the elaborate prepared meals devoured that would make the mainstream cringe.

Who on earth are the one percenters?

Along with Sheikhs and Princes, HNWI (High Net Worth Individuals) are considered, by luxury marketers, as the elite segment of the market. According to the Capgemini Wealth Management World’s Wealth Report 2018, it defines HNWIs as those who possess at least US$1 million in financial assets. On the other hand, there are the ultra-HNWIs or UHNWI as those who hold at least US$30 million in financial assets, with both excluding collectibles, consumables, consumer durables and primary residences. The report states that following a robust growth of 8.3% in 2010, the global population of HNWIs grew marginally by 0.8% to 11.0 million in 2011. Most of the growth can be attributed to HNWIs in the US$1 million to US $5 million wealth band that represent 90% of the global HNWI population. The top three countries, U.S, Japan and Germany, retained 53.3% of the total share of HNWIs

Clearly, One Percenters have different expectations and experiences than the rest of us. Here are just a few of this target audience’s distinguishing traits:

–       They are better educated;

–       Have traveled more (and continue to do so);

–       Own one or more successful business and/or inherited their wealth;

–       Possess investments mainly in real estate, stocks and bonds;

–       Are avid connoisseurs of the fine arts/cultural events and vintage/wines;

–       Own top quality merchandise: elaborate homes, exotic cars, bespoke attire, as well as seek services which cater to their discernment;

–       Have explored plenty more in their lives due to their significant disposable income/wealth.

In a recent American Affluence Research Center report, its founder and researcher, Ron Kurtz recommends that: “Luxury brands and luxury marketers should be focused on the wealthiest one percent because they are the least likely to be cutting back (during tough economic times) and are the most knowledgeable about the price points and brands that are true high-end luxury.”

What do the HNWIs and UHNWIs seek in their lifestyle?

According to the white paper, Strategies for Effectively Marketing to High Net Worth Consumers”, written by Richard Becker (August 2008), High Net Worth Individuals enjoy Golf, tennis and physical fitness ‒ endeavors typically associated with exclusive ‘members only’ clubs.

HNWIs/UHNWIs cherish their time and know what they want. Even time is a luxury and limited resource for them, thus saving time greatly trumps saving money. This is part of the reason service is crucial for them. They can be generally described as:

– Seek a higher and exacting standard with a minimum set of expectations;
– Fussy in nature;
– Often require customized solutions to mirror their lifestyle – whether a product or service;
– Take pleasure on getting extra attention from the brands they pursue;

– Prefer the uncommon to the mundane;
– Expect to be offered unique choices and experiences;
– Synonymous with a taste for luxury with pedigree and craftsmanship which they’re able and willing to pay;
– Aspire an aura of exclusivity;
– Crave an experience heightened by exceptional service along with a personal relationship;
– Seek products which are different and more sophisticated – whether it’s apparel, electronics, food or insurance;
– Want to feel in command of their purchase decision without any pressure;

– Expect discretion and confidentiality – most notably from service providers such as private wealth institutions and concierge services amongst others.

Likewise, what they purchase is a visual extension of their individuality and lifestyle. A well-crafted product, for example, reflects an individual call to beauty.

The preeminent luxury brands remain top of mind with the HNWI/UHNWI

When the premium plumbing brand, The Kohler Company, introduced the ultimate toilet fit for the well-heeled, it developed a contemporary industrial design that would make Apple glow with envy. Numi, as the model was baptized, includes technology and engineering that is unconventional with most toilets as we know them. Its features include, amongst others, ambient lighting, a bidet, foot warmers, a seat warmer, music, lighting, and hands-free flushing – which are all controlled through a remote which, with a press of a button, also lifts and lowers the lid. All this can be had for a mere $6500.

Luxury purveyors who aspire to cater to the top tier of spenders should have a mission, vision and a sound implementation strategy to reach this elite demographic target ‒ short of simultaneously pursuing the aspirational consumers who are prone to cutting back when the economy takes a dive. This latter group of consumers dilutes the cachet of the brand and can turn out less profitable in the long run. Moreover, the HNWI/UHNWI frown upon offerings which are accessible to the mainstream as they desire status and exclusivity.

Products and services should be unique, well designed and packaged, finely crafted ‒ and executed with refinement for the elite. Those are ways to entice the interest of, and ultimately retain, the ultra-wealthy. Products and services should never appear as ordinary yet absolutely personal.

In the luxury sector, traditionally there hasn’t been any shortage of customization for the very well heeled. Exclusive and bespoke travel companies provide tailor made adventures and excursions, whereas, the ultra-luxury and exotic automobile sectors such as Rolls Royce and Ferrari respectively offer a wide array of customization options. Each vehicle coming out of the studio will be completely unique and guided by a personal designer at the manufacturers. This is how ‘the total customer experience’ materializes.

Some of the most prominent companies that cater to the 1% include:

LVMH Moët Hennessy ‒ Louis Vuitton S.A (French conglomerate that owns a legion of luxury brands including Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, Fendi, TAG Heuer, and Dior cosmetics among many others and in various categories), Chanel, Hermes, PPR/Kering (owns controlling shares of Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent, among others), Richemont (owns the prestigious Alfred Dunhill, Cartier and Montblanc brands along with many others), Rolls Royce Motors, Bentley Motors, Bugatti Motors, Rolex, Patek Philippe, Goldman Sachs, Gulfstream, Sotheby’s, Bulgari, Tiffany & Co., and Harry Winston to name a few.

Luxury service brands follow a similar pattern. Consider American Express − most notably for its “by invitation only” Black/Centurion card. For hotels, worthwhile mentions are the Hotel Plaza Athenée, the Four Seasons (including its private jet tours), the Ritz Carlton, and boutique hotels Hotel du Cap and Hotel de Crillon to name a few prominent ones. They splurge and provide the perfect luxury experience with outstanding service, exclusivity, and pedigree.

How the luxury purveyors reach, cater and retain the 1%

Studies over the years have shown that the HNWIs/UHNWIs travel frequently and usually do so on a private jet. It’s also a fact that emerging markets from commodity rich countries such as Brazil, Russia, India and China, have a tremendous amount of new ultra wealthy citizens that can’t be ignored.

Reaching them is not easy. However, following are several approaches the prestigious luxury brands are utilizing.

–       Target them in their gathering places in major cities where most UHNWIs reside – London is such a prominent location;

–       Sponsor and/or advertise where the HNWI/UHNWI meet and play such as prestigious golf clubs, polo events etc. Rolex supports prestigious sporting and cultural events all over the world including tennis, the arts, golf tournaments and yachting.

–       Advertise in private jet terminals worldwide called Fixed Base Operators (FBOs) ‒ facilities that handle non-scheduled flights. One such opportunity is in Davos (Switzerland), towards the end of January, where the World Economic Forum is held. There are also magazines, such as “Privat Air” which are published specifically for private jet travelers. In 2012, there were over six million private jet flights. It is, undoubtedly, a targeted audience where one reaches the ultra-wealthy family together – which may be discussing a product or service you may be offering. Swiss watchmaker Audemars Piguet had several helipads with their logo located on Manhattan’s 34th Street.  The helipads included paintings of their watches which functioned as landing markers.

–       Meet and woo its discerning target customers at high profile industry shows and events. Burgess Yachts, for example, participates at the annual Super Yacht Show in Monaco which draws the well-heeled shopping for a multi-million dollar yacht.

–       Hone in cities where the ultra-wealthy normally visit for the finest luxury shopping experiences – mainly Milan, Paris and London with their shops on prestigious avenues;

–       Are promoters of good taste and the arts which is what the super-rich equally enjoy;

–       Make an effort to approach/communicate with influential members of entourages such as drivers, personal assistants, pilots and bodyguards;

–       Advertise and contribute content in prestigious lifestyle magazines which cater to the ultra-affluent including Amex’s ‘Departures’ magazine, ‘Worth’, ‘Elite Traveler’, ‘Monocle’ and ‘Burgess’ amongst others.

–       It goes without saying that successful brands have an online presence/visibility including a clean looking and engaging website, along with a carefully targeted social media existence to build long term online awareness, loyalty and value for the brand.

Along with what the prestigious brands are doing to attract the top spenders, consider creating an exclusive/”members only” online club/site. Moreover, if you’re offering products, boasting about artistic development by engaging with them and encouraging a visit to your atelier to witness your product being crafted. Videos should also be considered for viewing online.

Research where the wealthy neighborhoods are worldwide by using demographic data.  This information reveals everything from median income and age, educational levels and consumption statistics.  Demographic data also helps improve target marketing and advertising.

Sell a distinct lifestyle which is what discerning clients look for. Be in the forefront of creativity and have all your staff, regardless of department/responsibility, as your brand ambassadors.

Occasionally, organize exclusive “by invitation” events as a patron appreciation gesture. Being invited to an exclusive event makes one feel notable. For example, Italian sports automaker Maserati invited a select number of brand loyalists to a new experience in Europe that gave them the opportunity to sail on-board the 70 ft./21,3 m Maserati sailboat. In addition, they drove models in its current range including the new Maserati Gran Turismo Sport model.

Create/publish an upscale lifestyle magazine, every other month or quarter, which should include noteworthy information on the brand and the arts, as well as the causes it supports – in an environmentally friendly print format, along with a digital version. The Bentley motors magazine is a good case in point. The layout, choice of articles/stories and advertisers reflect the tastes of its existing and potential customers.

Helipad Ads - Luxury watches

Removing some of the guilt of ostentatiousness

Corporate Social Responsibility or CSR, along with sustainability issues, is a trend increasingly practiced in the luxury domain to send a message to their audience that they it cares. This is communicated through sponsorships, advertising, public relations, their websites and other media sources. The message conveyed is to enjoy guilt-free ostentatious purchases where part of the purchase price is donated to a worthwhile cause. Louis Vuitton uses celebrities in its advertising campaigns whose fee goes to charity.

Any business which is willing to get involved in social causes to impress its target market should make a genuine effort genuine, as sophisticated consumers can tell when it doesn’t come across as a genuine effort

Putting it all into perspective

In the United States, the top 1% possess 40% of the wealth; it owns half of all the stocks, bonds and mutual funds.

Fickle and discriminating, these customers’ purchasing attitudes are based on personal beliefs and taste for finer things in life along with discretion. They are quite selective, know what they want and aspire to be catered to effortlessly. They seek the total customer experience along with pampering, personalized service which can include fashion consultations and exotic journeys. Best of all, they are willing to pay top money for the products and services they want.

An offline strategy requires an equal online presence. This is accomplished by placing stunning imagery, video, engaging content and constant refinements along with savvy Internet marketing to connect the brand with luxury social channels. It’s connecting with its like-minded audience.

Think brand positioning and focus on, as well as cater solely to, your core market rather than be all things to all people. Stay out of the bottom end and aspirational markets and instead, aim at the top end markets.

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Catering to a “Luxury Lifestyle”: Definition and Execution

by James D. Roumeliotis

Yacht Lifestyle Shot from the Air

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A “luxury lifestyle” denotes a way of life which is pleasantly enhanced through well crafted products and exceptional services. These include dining at the best restaurants, lounging in the finest hotels, dressing in premium and bespoke clothing, wearing jewellery/watches produced in limited quantities, possessing and driving the most extravagant cars, traveling to exotic destinations, and playing with the most sophisticated tech products – amongst others. Needless to say, those consumers are connoisseurs of the finest products and services money can afford them.

According to a white paper and survey, conducted by the prestigious consulting firm McKinsey & Co., it indicates that there is no widely accepted definition of “luxury lifestyle.” It goes on to say that Attendees of the 2012 Financial Times Business of Luxury Summit suggested the following definitions: “a way of living,” a set of “attitudes and values,” or specific “consumption habits.”  Consumers interviewed in London, Milan, Munich, and Paris gave equally diverse definitions. Some offered a broad perspective (“a way of being, dressing, behaving” that “sets you apart from the rest”); others referred to particular products, brands, and experiences (“staying at nice hotels”); still others took a cynical view (“it’s just brand names, that’s all” or “it’s marketing”). Its interviews with senior executives from luxury- goods companies such as Harry Winston, Hermès, and Roberto Cavalli yielded yet another varied set of definitions, including “embodying the lifestyle of an iconic designer” and “offering a holistic brand experience.” Although they all defined the phrase differently, 70 percent of the executives they interviewed said they regard their brands as luxury-lifestyle brands.

A company can define itself as a lifestyle brand when its products promote more than a product with key benefits and attributes. However, lifestyle branding is more than just promoting “a way of life.” It is a product or service that provides consumers with an emotional attachment to the lifestyle of the brand. Take Versace, for example, which besides its fashion apparel and accessories also has hotels, home furnishing/décor, linens, beauty and more. Giorgio Armani also has his eponymous name on hotels, furniture, fashion, jeans and beauty. From these two fashion icons, we can certainly surmise that they have a legitimate claim as “luxury lifestyle” purveyors.

Developing the luxury standard of living through desirable customer experiences

Lifestyle branding is more than just promoting “a way of life”. it is a product or service that provides consumers with an emotional attachment to the lifestyle of the brand. think of Ralph Lauren and you can readily see it is not about the clothes. it becomes an attachment such as the sports car brand Porsche to an exclusive club in which you can be a member through emotional identification through use of the products in question. Smart companies understand these principles and look to keep the customer engaged. By doing so, they clearly forge the sort of long term relationships, which become the envy of their designated sector.

The “Total Customer Experience” is the sum total of the interactions that a customer has with a company’s products, people, and processes. It goes from the moment when customers see an ad to the moment when they accept delivery of a product and beyond.

The experiences customers go through with a purveyor of luxury determine the ultimate perception of its brand and image. Customer experiences also spread the word (offline/online) to others (friends, relatives etc.) about your brand. That said, each customer contact (“touch points”) should be handled with the utmost care to ensure that the total brand experience a person has is constant.

Lifestyle brands develop emotional attachment

Brand loyalty is about building an emotional, and in some cases, irrational, attachment in a product. The most ideal examples are the diehard brand enthusiasts and early adopters who must get their hands on the latest iPhone or iPad. This happens because Apple has built an emotional attachment to their products by creating a lifestyle choice rather than a product purchase.

It’s about how it makes you feel. Same goes for baby boomers, whether accountants or attorneys or business executives who purchase a Harley Davidson motorcycle and ride them for about four or five hours every Sunday afternoon. The bike makes them feel like a rebel – sort of an escape.

A brand that is designed for a lifestyle should have a much higher emotional value to consumers than one based on features like cost or benefits alone. The goal of a lifestyle brand is to become a way that people can utilize it to relate to one another. Those brands are an attempt to sell an identity, or an image, rather than a product and what it actually does.

Lifestyle brands have gained an increased share of the luxury market such as BMW, Armani, W Hotels, Louis Vuitton and Rolex ‒ just to name a few. These have given way to consumers to buy products that they associate with a “luxurious life.” They are essentially a status symbol.

The luxury lifestyle in the services domain

In the category of “services”, the luxury lifestyle is all about execution in delivering an exceptional experience with pizzazz to the discerning ─ whether it is a bespoke travel excursion in an exotic place, producing an exceptional dining experience or organizing an over-the-top event, each one ought to create a pleasant memory which would want to be repeated.

A successful service related luxury lifestyle exists when the following take place.

– Delivered with passion
– Exclusivity
– Discretion
– Exceeding expectations
– Seamless
– Refined
– Posh
– With attention to detail

Consider American Express − most notably for its “by invitation only” Black/Centurion card. For hotels, worthwhile mentions are the Hotel Plaza Athenée, the Four Seasons (including its private jet tours), the Ritz Carlton, and boutique hotels Hotel du Cap and Hotel de Crillon to name a few prominent ones. They splurge and provide the perfect luxury experience with outstanding service, exclusivity, and pedigree.

Exclusive and bespoke travel companies provide tailor made adventures and excursions. The four key players in this category include: Abercrombie & Kent, Kuoni Travel, Orient-Express and Cunard Line. Broadening our view of luxury services, certain firms offer services and privileges to a rare percentile. Such services include fractional jet ownership such as NetJets and FlexJet, as well as global concierge services such as Quintessentially.

In the final analysis

Whether offering a product or service, it is how a luxury brand delivers an experience that distinguishes it and makes it stand-out from the mainstream. In essence, it’s a holistic approach.

Luxury lifestyle brand offerings should be constantly refreshed, giving discerning customers a reason to repeatedly do business with the brand. Tiffany & Co., decided to undergo “investing in the theater of shopping in its stores”, as its CEO Frederic Cumenal implied as regards to the renovations of its largest store ever which it opened in China.

Selling a distinct lifestyle is what discerning clients crave and gladly relate to. Organizing exclusive by-invitation-only events should be considered. Exclusive events make one feel notable. For example, Italian sports automaker Maserati invited a select number of brand loyalists to a new experience in Europe that gave them the opportunity to sail on-board the 70 ft./21,3 m Maserati sailboat. In addition, they drove models in its current range including the new Maserati Gran Turismo Sport model.

In the end, living the luxury life is irresistible to many from every range of background and nationality. The temptation includes the aspirational affluent.

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Lifestyle Branding: Engagement and the Total Experience

by James D. Roumeliotis

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When you visit your local Porsche dealership be prepared to engage. Staff will talk to you about the total experience. This will invariably include discussing the firm’s racing pedigree and performance. In your mind, you will be able to feel the steering wheel, smell the leather seats, and hear the roar of the engine. This car represents to you an exclusive club and you desire to be part of the privileged few. Clearly, one does not buy a Porsche simply to go from point A to point B. In practice, you might use this vehicle to commute to work, but this is not the incentive to purchase a piece of automobile and racing history.

Porsche is clearly a brand with authenticity and heritage. The principals shaping the consumer’s buyer behavior go beyond intention. There is a sense of engagement in fulfilling a dream. It can be to make a social status statement or a personal style choice. Whatever it is, it is not an unconscious choice. The codifiers are clear: This is who I am, and what I believe in. Ultimately, it can also articulate your sense of self-worth and your emotional aspirations.
The most important emotional benefit in my view is that a product of this caliber and class expresses itself when the consumer can declare: “It suits my lifestyle.”

Lifestyle brands matter
Not every brand is a lifestyle brand regardless of whether it strives to portray itself as such…

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