Tag Archives: creative food product marketing

Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) Marketing Tactics: Spending Less and Generating More Exposure & Revenues

by James D. Roumeliotis

Hexagon Honey Packaging

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When it comes to marketing food products, known in industry jargon as “Consumer Packaged Goods (using the acronym “CPG”), it takes more than mere advertising. Any brand with a deep advertising budget can do so. However, the skill is in knowing how to best utilize a limited budget for maximum effectiveness. Surprisingly, many smaller brands seem to be running circles around their much bigger brand counterparts with greater resources. The key differentiator is in the strategy and implementation including the ideal target market, brand positioning and specific media sought.

Guerrilla marketing: Getting noticed on a shoestring budget

Persuading consumers to consider your product on their shopping list takes time and an ample marketing budget. However, getting consumers to take notice of your product can be swift if a combination of Guerrilla/unconventional marketing tactics are used in conjunction with unique packaging design.

The term “Guerrilla marketing” refers to an unconventional and bold approach for a business to promote its products and/or services in ways that capture the attention of potential customers. They are creative, memorable, attract people’s attention (some may be controversial) and require a limited budget which makes it ideal for small to mid size businesses. “Guerrilla marketing” was originally coined in 1983 by Jay Conrad Levinson who also wrote the book “Guerrilla Advertising” with subsequent editions and derivatives which followed.

In keeping with the CPG theme, Nestle’s Kit Kat candy bar brand utilized Guerrilla marketing by placing creative candy-themed benches across large cities as the image below depicts.

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Today, if a brand, especially a new arrival on the market, wants to stand-out in a crowded marketplace, it ought to consider the following means and tactics.

Online/digital Content marketing: This is absolutely the medium/platform which should not be overlooked. Even large brands are placing more emphasis with digital in their integrated marketing strategy. Content is released frequently but in small doses utilizing Twitter, blogs, Linkedin etc. along with stunning lifestyle images and video with must view material (Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook, YouTube, Vimeo to name the most prominent digital venues).

Public Relations: As this is earned media, what is stated about a brand from a third party is considered trustworthy. Creating buzz through the media, including the use of press releases, is an inexpensive way to earn publicity in lieu of traditional advertising spend.

Alliances – associations – sponsorships: These are additional considerations to boost exposure which turns-out to be a win-win for both parties (sponsor and sponsored party/ beneficiary).

Storytelling: A brand should include storytelling which places an emphasis on the brand’s heritage, the reason for being and why it is offering such a product or products. It is more than content and a narrative, it is a picture made up of feelings, facts and interpretations.

Food packaging: Eating with our eyes

The value added in design, craftsmanship, branding and overall quality can elevate a product into an epicurean delight. Clever and innovative design significantly increases sales and improves brand performance. In addition, it can do plenty of silent marketing. Consider Toblerone, the Swiss chocolate bar brand, whose distinctive yellow triangular packaging and equally shaped product inside is instantly recognizable. It undoubtedly portrays a premium product yet offers a good value for the price. The brand’s marketing spend is much less than its competitors, though its sales and profits are known to be exceptional in its category.

There are many ways of seeing the value of design. For instance, you can measure sales and relative value as an output of changes in design. Design can also improve your standing among rivals and give you a competitive advantage. The Design Council published a report where facts and statistics concerning the value of design are highlighted. One interesting statistic is that design conscious businesses can expect a return on their internal design investments as high as 125%. That’s quite an impressive return compared to other types of investments made in a business.

What may be obvious is that if you have high quality design, you do not need to compete with your competitors on price. If the design of a product packaging has a “wow” factor to make it stand-out on the shelf, then consumers will choose it even if the price is slightly above the competing products. If the product inside is as good as its packaging, customers will enjoy what you have to offer and continue to be loyal to your brand. That is the result of offering something unique and of a higher standard.

Lifestyle marketing: Non-traditional methods to reach modern consumers

Generally speaking, a brand that is designed for a lifestyle should have a much higher emotional value to consumers than one based solely on features, benefits and cost. A study from the Kellogg School of Management revealed that brands serve as a means of self-expression along with the limitations of expressing a consumer’s identity through brands. The goal of a lifestyle brand is to become a way that people can utilize it to relate to one another. Those brands are an attempt to sell an identity, or an image, rather than a product and what it actually does.

Two CPG brands which have joined the lifestyle bandwagon and spending more money and resources away from traditional marketing are Oreo and Red Bull. The former has created one article and image on the pulse of pop culture per day for 100 days with not much revealed of what would come next. Red Bull which spends a staggering 30% of its revenue in marketing and sponsorship events, has also launched a magazine with over five million subscribers, including a record label and two film studios to produce its lifestyle and experiential material.

Healthy eating and acquiring new tastes are modern day trends which can’t be ignored by CPG marketers. Smaller portions are also a recent trend which equate to less calories for consumption along with much focus on natural and non-GMO ingredients.

Creating new categories and uncontested market space

Instead of competing head-on in the same product category, as the majority of brands are accustomed to, consider creating an entirely new class which will be in an uncontested marketplace. This approach is known as Blue Ocean Strategy®. It was developed by two professors at INSEAD, W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne who are also co-authors of Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make the Competition Irrelevant (Harvard Business Review Press). As they put it, they observed that companies tend to engage in head-to-head competition in search of sustained profitable growth. Yet in today’s overcrowded industries competing head-on results in nothing but a bloody “red ocean” (as in cutthroat competition turns the ocean bloody red) of rivals fighting over a shrinking profit pool. Lasting success increasingly comes, not from battling competitors, but from creating “blue oceans” of untapped new market spaces ripe for growth.

Blue Ocean Strategy Chart

An intriguing case study which puts the above strategy in perspective is Australia’s Casella Wines. In 2001, it entered the overcrowded and highly competitive wine industry in the U.S. with its Yellow Tail brand. By the end of 2005, it had reached sales with 25 million cases ─ achieved on a limited marketing budget. This triumph placed Yellow Tail in the category of the overall bestselling 750ml (25.4 U.S. fl. oz.) red wine, outstripping Californian, Italian and French wine brands. It accomplished this by applying the Blue Ocean strategy framework. Consequently, Casella Wines’ Yellow Tail brand targeted the beer and ready-to-drink cocktails in the U.S. market and created Yellow Tail to be easy drinking, an informal selection, fun and an adventure ─ in essence, an uncomplicated, fruity wine structure that was instantly appealing to the mass of alcohol drinkers.

A category which should not be ignored are Millennials (aka Generation Y). They are projected to spend $65 billion on consumer packaged goods (CPG) over the next decade, yet there are many misconceptions and challenges in reaching these shoppers, according to a white paper by WPP’s Geometry Global. Millennials are the largest generation since the Baby Boomers. They are known to be quite sophisticated, technology wise, unaffected by most traditional marketing and sales pitches. As a result, CPG companies should adjust and innovate to stay digitally connected with the Millennial consumer.

Sensorial branding: Exploiting the senses

In keeping with the spirit of the five senses, you can exploit them entirely to create a favorable experience in synergy, for guests and clients alike. Below are some of the most important factors:

SIGHT – choice of packaging, its design along with its images, the font type and colors. Add to that a stand-alone point of purchase (POP) display.

TOUCH – the feel and ergonomic design of the packaging. This is how the consumer interacts with it. Plenty of emphasis should be placed on this when designing the package.

TASTE – finding the perfect balance between sour, salty, sweet, and bitter. Food product samples ought to be available as consumers would prefer to try a product they are exposed to for the first time. Presentation is equally important which has an impact on the overall image of the setting.

SMELL – it is all about the smell of the product. This sense is closely linked to emotion and memory. You can use something like computer controlled scent machines to entice. Sensory technology can be very influential down an aisle. Case in point: a French bakery café can deliberately use ventilation to deliberately spread the smell of roasted coffee and baked items sold to induce clients to make or increase their purchases. A company which is known to furnish such state-of-the art equipment is Scent Air Technology.

By integrating the brand-building strategies to appeal to all, or most of the senses, sales have actually increased.

At the end of the day

Marketing done well can improve your brand’s awareness, lead to more sales, word-of-mouth, as well as gain client loyalty.

Using clever marketing approaches which do not cost a fortune, along with innovative and attractive packaging, can lead to impressive sales. However, to develop repeat purchases (think “sell-through” at the retail level), the product itself should taste good and produced with quality ingredients.

Stay in touch with your customers via social media interactions and occasional email newsletters and a blog. Do what you can to improve the lives of these people with valuable advice and special offers. The product should exude that it occupies a part in a pleasant lifestyle.

Remain true to what is making your CPG brand a success and refuse to become complacent. Keep refining, innovating, never mislead (through false benefit claims and nutritional information) and engage constantly with your loyal clients. These activities are not deemed a onetime event but rather an on-going process.

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The Essence of Creative Consumer Product and Packaging Design

by James D. Roumeliotis and contributing guest,
Thomas C. Mylonas, Creative Entrepreneur & CEO of Dot Kite Design-Branding

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When you head to the grocery store to pick up a product such as cereal, do you purchase the same one each and every time or, like many consumers, are you comparing and contemplating about which one to grab?

When presented with a large range of choices to fulfill a need, it is in human nature to become confused, thus the inability to quickly make a choice. When we spend too much time comparing the plethora of options we are presented with, the functional differences between each of them soon become blurry. Once the functional differences lose importance, the peripheral aspects take precedence. This means that whichever product’s ad, spokesperson, or packaging color stands out favorably in our minds will most likely influence our product purchase.

What does this signify for those responsible for branding and communications for such low-involvement products?

The peripheral aspects must stand out for products in categories where the number of substitutes is vast enough to cause customer confusion close to the point of purchase. Axe, a brand of male grooming products owned by the British/Dutch company Unilever is a good example of this.

Their marketing messages are well known and hold a great amount of recall. They are likely to be quite popular in the deodorant and body spray isle where men are faced with more brands than they can count. The functional superiority or inferiority takes a back seat in such a situation.

Those factors differ for high-involvement goods, such as in cars, watches and so on, where the customer is not likely to make a grab-and-go purchase. In these cases, functionality, brand values and associations begin to play a key role.

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Branding: Creating Exclusive Food Design

by James D. Roumeliotis and Thomas Mylonas – Creative Entrepreneur of http://www.dotkite.eu

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Fast moving consumer goods can be branded, but how do you make one exclusive? I’m not talking about your grade A brand of butter, but something beyond this standard. I mean something that is not a part of a multinational such as Unilever, but something so exclusive that it can only be hand crafted.

In that case, would there have to be a new name? Handicraft is not necessarily fast. It takes time to do things right with the utmost care for quality. At any rate, we would like to attest to the total control over quality, design, and branding that can create not a grade A brand, but something exclusive.

The value added in design, craftsmanship, branding and overall quality can elevate an ordinary product into something special. Take the case of acorn-fed Iberian ham, for example. If you go to the stores that offer such ham, you will find yourself paying as much for a leg of ham as an intercontinental flight.

You can also look at certain brands of cheese, pesto, and wine, for example. Of course you can come up with some brands In these, and many other cases, it is possible to create a world famous brand using skilled craftsmanship, quality design, and the right brand identity. A few examples of exclusive (as opposed to top) brands are:

* Jamón Gran Reserva Joselito Premium
* Prosecco Spumante Cirotto DOCG – Extra Dry
* Château Mouton Rothschild
* Olive Country

So, are you in the food industry? Do you think you can add extra value and create an exclusive brand? Of course you can. It just requires the right ingredients, craftsmanship, and branding so that you will have customers flocking to you to taste the glorious gastronomical quality food that you created.

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