Category Archives: marketing strategy

Brand Experience, Not Product Branding: Cutting Through the Clutter

by James D. Roumeliotis

Brand Experience

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Products in the same class-categories struggle to differentiate themselves. Consumers often take brands for granted. Purchases are not so much conscious brand selection as choice by default. The two following examples highlight this. Going out for coffee in North America usually dictates a visit to Starbucks. When sparkling water is ordered at a restaurant, Perrier appears almost by magic.

The age of the internet has made copying competitors’ products, marketing strategies, and overall business practices to name a few. It’s not enough to merely compete at a product and pricing level which doesn’t take long to be outdone. Anyone can lower prices. What begs the question is where you draw the line before your profit margins are eroded to the point of no return and many ramifications for a business. Savvy marketers look beyond pricing and product features. Instead, they search for sustained ways to market their brand rather than their product.

“Branding” redefined for the new era

 To begin with, a “Brand” is a promise of something that will be delivered by a business. This promise comes in a form of quality, an experience and a certain expectation in the mind of the consumer. It includes the Unique Selling Proposition (USP). Marketing, on the other hand, is about spreading compelling messages to your target audience while branding is a combination of words and action. Marketing is extroverted and communicates quickly, while branding is introverted and a slow process if it’s to produce any real impact. Effective marketing activities are vital in developing a brand. When combined successfully, branding and marketing create and promote value, trust, loyalty and confidence in a company’s image, products and services.

When consumers are delighted by a particular brand experience, they begin to bond emotionally with the brand. They become brand loyalists and advocates – buying the brand more often and recommending it to others. This behavior serves to build the brand’s reputation.

A branding strategy should consist of:

  • Brand Positioning – Position is a descriptive sentence, slogan or image the brand is known for in the mind of the consumer and which the company delivers on it consistently. This is what sets the product or service apart from competitors.
  • Brand Identity – This is every visual expression of the brand, whether in print, television, digital or the iconic (Pullman) brown color identifying the trucks and delivery staff of the UPS courier company.
  • Brand Experience – Generally speaking, brands that are designed for a lifestyle should have a much higher emotional value to consumers than ones based on features like cost or benefits alone.
  • Storytelling – Brands build relationships by the stories they tell. Stories add personality to products which customers can better relate to and feel affinity with. Luxury brands boast their pedigree.
  • Engaging with your target audience – this is conducted through social media and asking for feedback. Simply put, engaged customers help you build your business.

The holistic selling proposition

Consumers today are more brand conscience, yet there are companies which continue to spend money advertising and selling product rather than brand. They place emphasis on price and quality as differentiators despite these two being overused by many copycats. Successful brands take a holistic approach to selling by exploiting the 5 senses which now constitute the brand. This is accomplished by what I regard as “ambiance marketing” and “sensory/sensorial branding”, through a captivating designed setting, yet alluring. This adds character and invites clients to truly feel the brand experience.

To put the aforementioned into perspective, consider the following:

  • Visual – lighting, décor, colors, layout…you can get a real sense of movement using these elements.
  • Auditory – music, effects, volume, vibrations…you set the tone and the energy of the room with your sonic selections.
  • Tactile textures, comfort, climate…this is all about how your guests interact with the environment.  This is a big thing to consider when you are designing the layout.
  • Olfactory fragrance, emotion, ambiance…this sense is under-rated and powerful. Of all our senses, the sense of smell is most closely linked to emotion and memory. You can use something as simple as burning incense or candles to something far more complex like computer controlled scent machines to enhance your environment. This could just be the extra touch needed to set the mood.
  • Gustative – with food establishments, the challenge is in finding the perfect balance between sour, salty, sweet, and bitter during menu designs and beverage selections.  The presentation also makes an impact on the overall image.

Customer Experience equals customer abbreviation

Developing the customer relationship through customer experiences

The Total Customer Experience is the sum total of the interactions that a customer has with a company’s products, people, and processes. It goes from the moment when customers see an ad to the moment when they accept delivery of a product and beyond.

According to Bain & Company, a leading management consultancy firm, out of 362 leading companies surveyed, 80% believe they deliver a superior customer experience, but only 8% of their customers agree.

The experiences customers go through with your business determine the ultimate perception of your brand and image. Customer experiences also spread the word (offline/online) to others (friends, relatives etc.) about your brand/image. That said, each customer contact (“touch points”) should be handled with the utmost care to ensure that the total brand experience a person has is constant. This requires proper training and occasionally evaluating employee performance. Moreover, improvements may be necessary with systems, technology, methods, services, products and even physical premises. Complacency should be replaced with continuous improvement.

Creating a lifestyle brand through emotional attachment

Brand loyalty is about building an emotional, and in some cases, irrational, attachment in a product. The most ideal example is when thousands of people line-up, regardless of weather conditions, to get their hands on the latest iPhone or iPad. This happens because Apple has built an emotional attachment to their products by creating a lifestyle choice rather than a product purchase.

It’s about how it makes you feel. Same goes for baby boomers, whether accountants or attorneys or business executives who purchase a Harley Davidson motorcycle and ride them for about four or five hours every Sunday afternoon. The bike makes them feel like a rebel – sort of an escape.

A brand that is designed for a lifestyle should have a much higher emotional value to consumers than one based on features like cost or benefits alone. The goal of a lifestyle brand is to become a way that people can utilize it to relate to one another. Those brands are an attempt to sell an identity, or an image, rather than a product and what it actually does.

Lifestyle brands have gained an increased share of the luxury market such as BMW, Armani, W Hotels, Louis Vuitton and Rolex ‒ just to name a few. These have given way to consumers to buy products that they associate with a “luxurious life.” They are essentially a status symbol.

B2B branding differentiation

Consumers are attracted to brands’ nonsensical benefits such as status, affinity, self-comfort and prestige, whereas, Business-to-Business (B2B) customers make their purchase decisions based on practical rationale including pricing, product performance and specifications, Moreover, brand loyalty in the B2B sector is higher than in consumer goods markets because companies in the commercial and industrial segments seek satisfying and long term relationships since jumping from supplier to supplier can cause havoc and inconsistencies with product quality control. Consequently, developing brand loyalty among enterprise customers can capture a larger share can increase profit margins while protecting them against lower-priced competitors.

The final take

The key to success is to market your brand, not your product. Contrary to popular belief, a brand is not a logo, label or product but rather a relationship with your customers. Branding positively adds value to your company including brand equity. This is considered intangible brand value.

A company can define itself as a lifestyle brand when its products promote a more than a product with key benefits and attributes. Note however that lifestyle branding is more than just promoting “a way of life.” It is a product or service that provides consumers with an emotional attachment to the lifestyle of the brand.

One way to overcome the ‘price only’ differentiation, which erodes profits and does not generate loyalty, is for a company to consider building a lifelong relationship with each customer. To do so, requires that each customer enjoys a positive and hassle-free transaction with each touch point. The goal is also to reduce or eliminate customer problems altogether, but that begins prior to and during the first contact with the customer. All problems should be documented, reviewed and corrected without much delay. Hiring the right people is vital, so is training them properly, as well as empowering them to deliver a remarkable customer experience.

When promoting brands, consider that earned media trumps paid media and enhances the brand image. With adverts, consumers don’t care what marketers say. According to a 2015 Nielsen Group report, “False” is the term 89% of consumers closely associated with advertising campaigns.

Whether a product or service ‒ is a luxury brand or falls into another category, it is how you stand out from the crowd that distinguishes you. Know your target audience, get inside their heads and understand how they think and feel. What are their fears, emotions and anxieties? Once you’ve understood this quite well, you then manage the brand consistently.

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Shady and Dysfunctional Enterprises: Deceit, Greed and Short-sightedness in the Name of Profit and Market Share

by James D. Roumeliotis

Dysfunctional Company Hierarchy

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Businesses of all sizes normally develop various pain points. A seasoned entrepreneur has actually made a list of 100. In the end, pain is a motivator for action to turn things around. However, the key is in how to tackle each one and in a timely manner. Better yet, how many of them are ever anticipated — and as a consequence solutions readily available? What is not anticipated are repercussions from poor decisions made or deceit deliberately caused with or without knowledge from company authorities. As a result, denial sets in from the top with accountability being dismissed.

Needless to say, chaos reigns within organizations which for many results in bleak outcomes. Within, there is a lack of communication, trust, transparency and loyalty. Not a sincere and astute way to operate a business.

By all appearances, there are plenty of executives who are simply results driven at the expense of their customers, employees as well as with their vendor relationships. Remarkably, most of those companies are publicly traded.

Corporations lack trust from consumers

A survey conducted by JUST Capital’s of more than 40,000 U.S. participants and groups indicates that the nation’s largest corporations are “going in the wrong direction.”

Overall, only 41 percent of all Americans trust corporations “somewhat” or “a great deal,” while 50 percent of more conservative Americans trust corporations.

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Source: http://justcapital.com/research

The cause of distrust among consumers can be rationalized due to corporations misleading the public as a whole, as well as their shareholders. Deliberate misleading information by food producers in regards to nutritional benefits and nickel-and-diming by airlines, hotels and banks are causes for frustration, suspicion and loathing.

Sectors notorious for constant price gouging coupled with despicable service include, but not limited to, a select number of pharmaceutical brands, banking/financial services, cellphone service providers, cable companies, large food brands and airlines. Too add salt to injury, in the U.S. and Canada, pointless aggressive lobbying efforts by various industries yield their influence by means of generous contributions to political parties. They are also infamous for spending a ludicrous amount of money producing sly ads and propaganda which go against consumer wishes. Consider the soda lobbyists who, according to a NY Times article, “made campaign contributions to local politicians and staged rallies, with help from allies like the Teamsters union and local bottling companies. To burnish its image, the industry donated $10 million to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.” Sadly for consumers and the city of Philadelphia, the tactics worked. Similar outcomes occurred in New York City and San Francisco. In the end, the soda industry’s rubbish of an astonishingly high calibre, comes as it does from the same producers of fatty chips to the semi-literate masses. Shameful practices include the deceitful marketing of chemically-calibrated and engineered to simply taste good processed food products that are making its mainstream market obese, thus unhealthy.

In certain types of large scale B2B transactions, there can be scope for unscrupulous behavior. One or both parties are tempted to forego ethics in favor of making the deal. Such relationships inevitably end badly because they are either uncovered by authorities, as well as not conceived with trust or respect.

Then there are the occasional devious companies that will do what it takes in the name of revenue and profit ─ disregarding authorities, customers and everyone who takes their trust for granted. Volkswagen’s blatant rigging of emissions tests with over 11 million of its diesel cars sold globally, 482,000 of which are VW and Audi brand cars in the U.S., is an ideal case in point. As a result of its mischievousness, the company known for its hard core corporate culture caused a great deal of damage to the environment. Their supposed clean diesel models have been spewing up to 40 times more smog-causing nitrogen oxide pollution. The recall is one example of a deliberate act gone terribly awry for a brand which wholeheartedly masterminded it with self-admission. Rather than sacking the CEO Martin Winterkorn, under whose watch this scandal occurred, and depriving him of his golden parachute, the supervisory board allowed the septuagenarian, Mr. Winterkom, to conveniently step down and take home a lucrative compensation package.

contact this author for his pragmatic and practical approach.>

Corporate governance or lack thereof

The term “Best practices” is not merely words but deeds. What is required is an efficient implementation of strategies, quality controls and delivering more than lip-service. Evidently, it is not easy, otherwise, many more businesses would be performing admirably.

To understand and penetrate the corporate governing structure and “culture”, you need look no further than the upper echelon of the hierarchical tree. It is where procedural decisions are shaped and executed. One would think and expect an entity’s leadership to head the enterprise by governing its long-term growth and sustained wealth. Conversely, there is a constant search for the “ideal” human resources. Recruited and fresh talent must resemble the leadership in tone and style. Call it the organization’s DNA. Exceptional organizations are good at these types of corporate strategies, thus strengthening performance effectively.

In the end, leadership ought to foresee and prevent any potential scandals, apply checks in balances, inspect what is expected, keep corporate structure layers to a minimum, and keep communication channels open.

Customers first, employees second — investors third

In the ivory towers of public corporations, the CEO and board of directors have been programmed to put their stakeholders best interests above all else. Their mission is to do what it reasonably takes to deliver quarterly results ─ in other words, to focus on the short term rather than sow the seeds and do what is most beneficial for the future direction of the company ─ despite any short term pains. Savvy and considerate top management know better that customers and employees are the two key drivers of corporate success.  The main principle is that if employees have a positive attitude, are passionate, well trained and competent, results will be reflected through positive customer experiences resulting in brand loyalty. Ultimately, the shareholders will reap the benefits through stock performance and generous dividend distributions.

Jack Ma, the founder and executive chairman of Alibaba Group, a family of highly successful Chinese Internet-based businesses, made a public statement which may have surprised the investment community. He publicly stated that, “Our customers come first, our employees second, and our shareholders third.”  The highly regarded membership-only warehouse club COSTCO performs actions consistent with one’s claims as they too follow Jack Ma’s mantra. The impressive financial results year after year speak volumes as they retain the best intentions of their employees and customers.

It took Amazon quite long to finally earn a profit since its inception. Founder Jeff Bezos and his senior executive team dug in their heels despite outcries from many of their shareholders for continuously making large capital investments with no profits in sight. For a while, plenty of cash was spent for IT related infrastructure including Cloud computing and everything related to giving the company an edge over the competition. Customer service and the customer experience have been priority no. 1. In the end, shareholders who lingered learned that patience with their investment in Amazon is a virtue in the long run.

The attitude of the individuals in the boardroom had better be that if investors are impatient and eager for quick monetary results, they can take their money and invest it elsewhere.

Advice for start-ups: ‘Steady as she goes’

A well-oiled operation should consistently head steadily on its current course regardless of any obstacles that get in its way.

Research by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals that nearly six out of 10 businesses shut down within the first four years of operation.

To be a successful entrepreneur is not an effortless task. It takes plenty of sacrifice. A new generation of young entrepreneurs think the road is smooth and a fast track to easy wealth. Not everyone will become Mark Zuckerberg. Obstacles and sacrifice are part of the deal. Harnessing opportunity and overcoming challenges on a daily basis to top the competition is constant work. These conditions are true no matter what the sector of business engagement or company size.

Telltale signs of weak organizations can be traced to inept leadership. The following points highlight the deficiencies:

  • Poor customer service – slow or no customer inquiry replies – abysmal handling of sales and service complaints. Service is portrayed as a reward, not a right or benefit.
  • No Unique Selling/Value Proposition. Companies need to define and articulate their unique value proposition and deliver on it consistently. Create the platform for sustainable and competitive advantage.
  • Operational deficiencies – various ailments and no structure
  • Absence of or very little communication among staff and management. Divisions aren’t well-coordinated and do not function as a team.
  • No transparency. There is hardly any openness from management.
  • Unethical practices – short-term selfish objectives in search of market share. Top executives should promote social norms and principles as moral agents.
  • Lack of proper execution of decisions and with new products/services.
  • Productivity incentives should be implemented to boost results and employee morale. People must be given a reason to work hard and be efficient.
  • Creativity is practically non-existent. An absence of innovation and employee empowerment will hurt progress and stifle new ideas.
  • No clear vision/strategy – there needs to be a strategic vision that reflects a truly unmet need and has the commitment of a dedicated CEO. That means that there is a well-defined target audience with a distinct value position that is differentiated, meaningful, and deliverable.
  • A weak sales force along with an unattractive compensation plan.
  • Favoring nepotism and bias – promoting family members over other qualified employees often leads to resentment or, worse, prompts valuable non-family employees to leave the company.
  • Poor hiring practices – should hire for attitude and train for skills.
  • Slow/delayed decision-making process – too many layers – overwhelming bureaucratic structure.
  • High turnover, which leads to poor employee morale, reduced intellectual capital, lower service levels, higher operational costs and decreased productivity.
  • Management in a state of denial about their organization’s shortcomings – remaining with the dysfunctional status quo
  • No channel strategy. Some companies focus on building a product, but don’t think through how to get it into the hands of customers. Even if your product is great, unless you can sell directly, you may be dead in the water without strong channel partners.
  • The hidden game – corporate politics – power plays by a handful of individuals for their own benefit to the detriment of their colleagues and the company.
  • Misrepresentation of brand(s) – too much hype – empty promises – not delivering on expectations – leads to dissatisfied clients who will alienate the brand.
  • Weak financial controls – cash flow dilemmas – over leveraged/undercapitalized (high debt-to-capital ratio) – not reinvesting a certain percentage of profits for future growth.
  • Absence of sound marketing program(s) and/or brand strategy. A brand is defined by how it behaves, from the products it builds to how it treats its customers, to the suppliers with whom it works.
  • Growing too fast and not staying on course as the company grows.
  • Lack or very little employee training & development.
  • Deficient in control systems – reactive rather than pro-active.
  • Lack of continuous improvements or complacent.

In the final analysis

In large corporations, the Boards should be held more accountable by paying closer attention to the behavior and actions in the C-suite ‒ thus reacting before things go awry.

The top executive’s job is to operate a business that adds value by means of the goods and services it provides to customers.

The way to solve an organizational problem is to confront the structural issues with a moral sense of purpose and ethics. Higher morale generates higher profits – though occasionally other priorities undermine that objective, for example, self-serving behavior by certain executives or chasing short-term selfish objectives in search of rapid market share, profits and self-interests before people. Monsanto’s executive conduct would make for a marvelous case study in this regard.

According to marketing maven Seth Godin, “It’s the flameouts and the scams that get all the publicity, but it’s the long-term commitment that pays off.”

Wish list of best practices should include but not limited to:

  • avoid potential scandals;
  • apply checks in balances in place;
  • inspect what is expected;
  • trust but verify;
  • retain corporate structure layers to a minimum, and
  • keep communication channels open.

In the end, what you manage and how you manage it is what you get — methodical, sustained growth with patience and lack of greed.

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The Challenger Brand: Going Up Against the Category Leader with an Alternative Product and Ethos

By James D. Roumeliotis

Challenger Brand

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The status quo is a complacent syndrome which exists with most established brands regardless of which sector they are categorized in. Despite a large capital chest, they are short-sighted, dull and lack the nimbleness to adapt swiftly. However, there those such as Nike and Amazon, among others, which innovate constantly. Nowadays, newbie companies fill in the gap and disrupt entire industries with revolutionary business models, products and services – whether in the service domain (think AirBnB, Uber and Netflix), automotive (consider Tesla) or in the consumer product domain (such as Dyson, Under Armour, Warby Parker and Hampton Creek’s Just Mayo brand).

The anatomy of the challenger brand

A “challenger brand” is defined as a company or product brand, whether a start-up or established, which faces up to the category leader in an advocacy stance. As a result, this type of brand/company is brusque to the point of creating and applying bold tactics. Furthermore, it is distinct and emotionally driven to be able play from a position of strength behind the dominant player in its sector. Consequently, the challenger brand eagerly takes on a unique position and showcases with conviction, to its target audience, why it is the logical alternative to the segment leader. Unique features offered may include enhanced features and benefits from those offered by the category leader. These may include better materials, technology, functional and attractive design, craftsmanship, performance, above average service, better value for the money, as well as social responsibility to name a few. This works well with consumers who are either under-served or under-valued by the leading brand.

Uber, with the birth of the ride sharing app, came along and challenged the taxi domain through a paradigm shift. It took the taxi leagues worldwide by storm which got the cabbies up in arms and resulted with them protesting and asking their local government to legislate against their nemesis. Rather than looking inward and reforming to compete, the cabbies chose the path to ferociously protect their precious monopoly. One taxi trade magazine even printed a column that condemned Uber as a “corporate pariah,” a “malignant tumor,” and a “giant octopus” that has “spread its tentacles globally.”

A challenger brand is determined to persist and persevere to constantly make a point to undermine the leading standard in order to change the rules to the benefit of the customer.

How to outsmart the category leader

When the challenger brand does not have the marketing budget to go head-to-head with the established brand in its category, it is easy to see why the latter can fail. To overcome this problem, the challenger creates unconventional marketing tactics which are more effective than traditional ones with much less ad spending. Sometimes that advertising is giving jabs to the weakness inherent with the category leader and it can include clever yet subtle messages which, if effective, may be able to persuade consumers who were leaning toward the established brand that it is not all that great as always thought.

Advocating and standing for something compelling, such as Patagonia with its social responsibility mission which is: “Build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.”  The idea is to make a strong emotional appeal about the changes they seek to make a difference with. It is demonstrating and personifying not only through mere words but also with deeds that they are a better alternative to the incumbent brand. This takes being and acting confident through passion, beliefs and a purpose against the norm in return for something that matters.

Jude Bliss, the editor of the online blog The Challenger Project, had made this noteworthy statement: “Challengers are as clear about what they are rejecting as they are about what they are championing, which involves clearly defining what you see in the current market that is broken, as well as what change you can bring.”

It does not matter whether you are a new and small brand or the largest. Everyone can partake as a challenger brand. As long as your largest competitor defies with your ethos, then you have a cause for a challenge. No better example of this than Apple vs Microsoft with their witty advertising jibes at each other as to whose PC is the smarter choice for the user.

Another tactic to use as a challenger brand, if you are in the consumer goods domain, is to be creative and stand-out among the crowd with exceptionally designed yet functional packaging. Taking away the bland and ordinary and making the product desirable. Consider what Toblerone chocolate, Veuve Cliquot champagnes, SKY Vodka and others have succeeded in doing which eventually spiked their sales.

Audi has taught other brands how to challenge

BMW and Mercedes Benz are two German premium leading auto brands which command an equal level of prestige and respect. Both are in the same league in terms of German engineering and precision. However, each has a distinctive style which distinguishes it in the target audience – younger who prefer dynamic driving and older demographic with preference for a luxury drive respectively. As regards to Audi, up until the several years ago, the brand was deemed as the awkward stepchild of the parent VW group — the Toyota of the German elite of sorts. Lately, Audi has stepped up its game and finally entered the world as a true competitor along with their German tagline exuding what they stand for: Advancement through Technology. Audi has been gaining on its German rivals. Its firm commitment to excel has brought Audi to an audacious position to vigorously challenge its opponents BMW and Mercedes.

In 2009 in a busy Los Angeles, California intersection, a billboard ad rivalry between what Audi initiated and with BMW responding had escalated to a new level. A tit-for-tat had ensued when Audi placed an image of the all new Audi A4 along with the headline: “Your move, BMW”. Santa Monica BMW, a local dealership, took on the challenge and entered a virtual chess game when it added a billboard not far from Audi’s which featured a photo of the BMW M3 with the counter punch, “Checkmate.” A few days later, Audi unveiled a new billboard to replace the one with the A4. It featured an R8 super-car and read: “Time to check your luxury badge. It may have expired.” In the end, BMW moved its billboard to some other place and the billboard ad war came to an end.

Audi and BMW Billboard Challenge 1

Audi and BMW Billboard Challenge 2

In a Brand Channel blog interview with Loren Angelo, director of marketing for Audi of America, has said that “As a challenger brand, you have to look at your category, your situation…and attack it head-on.” He further elaborated: “We need to continue to challenge. That’s what allowed us to drive our position and to turn the brand around beginning in 2008. A challenger brand doesn’t mean we only challenge the competition, but we communicate how we challenge the status quo and challenge complacency in our industry and in culture.”

That being said, as a challenger brand, constant and persistent messaging with conviction to the target audience ought to be applied along with the delivery of unique customer experiences to solidify brand loyalty.

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The Top 10 Most Read Articles in this Blog for 2015

by James D. Roumeliotis

Top 10 Articles for 2015

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As in every year, I have once again rounded up the ten most read/popular articles — this time for  2015. The following ten captured the most attention by numbers and from 154 countries in all. See them all below in descending order.  Your views are always encouraged including subject matter you think I should be covering more of.

THANK YOU for your readership and I look forward to feeding your mind with much more business practical food for thought this year which can be applied for timely results.

1 Luxury vs. Premium vs. Fashion: Clarifying the Disparity

2 Perceived Quality: Why Brands Are Intangible

3 The Art of Selling Luxury Products: Brand Story Telling & Persuasion

4 Mass Customization & Personalization: The Pinnacle of Differentiation and Brand Loyalty

5 Exceeding the Hotel Guest Experience: Anticipating and Executing Desires Flawlessly

6 Brand Awareness: the influence in consumers’ purchasing decisions

7 The Ultra Luxury Purveyors: Lessons from brands catering to the richest 1 percent

8 Identifying and Catering to the Discerning Consumer: Quality and Service Above All

9 Start-up Essentials: A Universal Roadmap for Starting a Business — Infographic

10 Product Features vs Benefits: The Brand Differentiation

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Giftvertising — a Brilliant Trend and Unconventional Marketing Tactic

by James D. Roumeliotis

WestJet's Christmas Miracle 2013 - Hamilton Airport, Ontario, Canada

WestJet’s Christmas Miracle 2013 – Hamilton Airport, Ontario, Canada

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Sadly, every day we are inundated with a slew of advertising messages almost everywhere we turn. There seems no escape.

A new study of media usage and ad exposure by Media Dynamics, Inc. reveals that a typical adult’s daily media consumption has grown from 5.2 hours in 1945 to 9.8 hours (or 590 minutes) currently.

Companies that wish to cut through the advertising clutter and stand-out are constantly utilizing unconventional and bold tactics through creative and methodical strategies. Through Giftvertising ‒ or gift giving captured on a video for advertising purposes, a brand develops memorable organized events with elements of surprise, while concurrently filming the reactions. The filmed message conveyed is one of generosity and caring to enhance customer perception.

Guerrilla marketing in video format

“Guerrilla” Marketing, a term was coined by Jay Conrad Levinson in his 1984 with his initial book entitled ‘Guerrilla Advertising’, is regarded as a bold, unconventional and low budget marketing/advertising strategy with effective results. In marketing, the element of surprise is a crucial method in breaking through a plethora of traditional advertising media. ‘Giftvertising’, an advertising trend, where marketers surprise their customers with free gifts, is akin to “Guerrilla” advertising in an online video format. Its aim is to create a highly entertaining and emotional bond with its customers and viewers. Furthermore, the scene filmed on video is anticipated to create buzz thus go viral on social media.

The advertising industry is constantly under pressure, by its demanding accounts, to create elaborate experiences for their targeted audiences. Ingenious campaigns are expected to break through the clutter, whilst differentiating a brand and improving its image which elevates its perception as trendy and customer driven. To be noticeably effective, the campaign required a public relations strategy approach, as well as be distinguished as authentic and purposeful by its viewing audience if it is to go viral.

Within the last few years, several brands experimented by launching their share of emotional based Giftvertising videos including WestJet Airlines which started it all with its “WestJet Christmas Miracle” − followed by others including TD Bank with its “Automated Thanking Machine”, Air Canada’s “Gift of Home for the Holidays” and MasterCard’s “Priceless Surprises.”

Case Study: WestJet

If there is a contemporary brand which inspired other Giftvertising campaigns which followed, it is none other than Canadian carrier WestJet Airlines Ltd. In December 2013, in time for the Christmas holiday season, it became one of the most watched viral videos over the Internet with over 40 million YouTube views (and counting). Additionally, it received numerous press mentions around the world. Consequently, other companies launched their own videos yearning similar results.

A year later in 2014, WestJet put out another remarkable Christmas video. This time it was set in the Dominican Republic. However, it did not reward its customers but instead it gave back to a small town in that country the airline flies to. Both videos average 5’30” each – an ideal amount of time to communicate the occasion without getting carried away.

Not surprisingly, both Giftvertising campaigns had a positive impact. They dramatically increased WestJet’s website visits along with bookings compared to the same month the previous years. All told, the company’s revenue soared by more than 80%.

All things considered

It takes unconventional marketing wisdom with bold tactics, along with a demonstration of genuine admiration and care for the customer, to produce emotional and memorable occasions including utter joy displayed by company employees. All this can have a profound effect on the millions of viewers. If it succeeds in its intended purpose, the publicity it generates on social media will be well worth the investment.

Giftvertising, undoubtedly, establishes a strong emotional bond between the brand and its customers just as it conveys a strong emotional impression boosting its positive image of a company one should certainly consider doing business with.

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Filed under Giftvertising, marketing strategy, public relations, publicity, viral campaigns